January 23, 2019

Community News

African-Americans in San Francisco City Policy Jan. 6 at 10 a.m. at New Liberation, 1100 Divisadero
January 2, 2018

This notice courtesy of San Francisco Community Leader Lynnette White. "Preserving those victories and insuring that today's leaders build on those successes is the objective of the conference." on Saturday, January 6th as historian John Templeton during "The Hannibal Williams/Mary Helen Rogers/Ardith Nichols/Geraldine Johnson Symposium," calls the community and Black elected officials to stay on point to build on the victories of such community leaders for whom the conference is named. University of San Francisco Professor, Dr. James Taylor, will share insights and his books: "Black Nationalism" and news of an upcoming book on the assassination of 900 San Franciscans in 1978 in Guyana.   

 John Templeton Gives Historic Tours of San Francisco

African-Americans in City Policy Jan. 6 at 10 a.m. at New Liberation, 1100 Divisadero


The Hannibal Williams/Mary Helen Rogers/Ardith Nichols/Geraldine Johnson Symposium of the Lower Fillmore Neighborhood Association focuses on African-Americans and City Policy at a pivotal junction in the history of San Francisco on Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 at New Liberation Presbyterian Church, 1100 Divisadero St. at 10 a.m. featuring Dr. James Taylor, associate professor of political science at University of San Francisco, author of   Black Nationalism and an upcoming book on the assassination of 900 San Franciscans in 1978 in Guyana.

   
Each of the pioneers (Hannibal Williams; Mary Helen Rogers; Ardith Nichols;Geraldine Johnson) honored gave their lives seeking equity in economics and public policy in the city through the Western Addition Community Organization, the Crispus Attucks Clubs and the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists.   Their landmarks include Supreme Court decisions, New Liberation, the African-American Art and Culture Complex, recreation centers and libraries, 13 schools and dozens o! f streets named for African-Americans, extensive affordable housing such as Midtown Apartments, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Waterfall and Fillmore Heritage Center. 

 
Preserving those victories and insuring that today's leaders build on those successes is the objective of the conference. In 1980, African-Americans were 13.4 percent of San Francisco's population, the second most numerous group. Admission is free and lunch will be served.  

John William Templeton 
Community Activist Award 2017 San Francisco NAACP 
Wanadu Aroo (history advisor) Songhoy People (guardians of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Mali) 
Board Member, Stillman College, Tuscaloosa, AL affiliated with Presbyterian Church U.S.A. 
Overture Advocate, 2018 General Assembly, Presbyterian Church U.S.A. 
Featured author, Frederick Douglass' birthday, African-American Civil War Museum 
Re-enactor, Rev. Henry Highland Garnet 
Creator, California African-American Freedom Trail 
Publisher, Journal of Black Innovation 
Leadership Team, Black Wealth 2020 
Visionary Award, 2016, California Black Chamber of Commerce


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